Resilience for Possible Imminent Redundancy

Resilience for Possible Imminent Redundancy


Posted by Jan Lawrence

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Problem Solving

Highly resilient people have the ability to look at problems and challenges from a comprehensive perspective.  Problems and challenges are viewed from many different perspectives, with many factors given consideration.   It is the ability to accurately identify the causes of an adversity and get outside of their habitual thinking styles to identify more possible causes and thus more solutions.

5 part Resilient Problem Solving Technique

 

Example scenario:  Possible imminent redundancy

 

1. Realistic Optimism

Define the problem and be specific.  Importantly, try to acknowledge any positives and do not ignore the negatives.  Think about what you can control and focus on that, rather than what you cannot control, then reframe as quickly as possible.

  • Threat of redundancy selection
  • Loss of income & status
  • Effect on family
  • Effect on me

2. Emotional Awareness

Think about what you are feeling, and think about what you need to do to manage your emotions.  Options include, therapeutic writing, emotional release, deep breathing, mindful meditation, mental rehearsal and thought stopping.

  • Anxiety
  • Anger
  • Apprehension
  • Uncertainty
  • Sadness
  • Excitement
  • Resentment
  • Acceptance

3. Problem Solving ABC’s

A – Generate options and think outside of the box, come up with as many different options as possible.

  • Offer to accept changes to current working conditions
  • Accept what will happen
  • Look for new job in same profession
  • Consider change of direction – retrain, self-employment
  • Contact business connections, competitors, related businesses
  • Who can give advice?

B –  Weigh up options.  Now it’s time to really delve deep into your problem solving and weigh up the viability and feasibility of the options you have generated.

  • What do I want?
  • What can I afford to do – severance payment?
  • What is realistic?
  • Discuss with partner/family

C – Choose an option.  Now choose an option, you may need to choose two depending on the situation.

  • Look for new job in same profession

4. Relationship Building

Taking action.  Now it’s time to push your own boundaries and expand your comfort zone by reaching out to new ideas and opportunities.  Ensure that each action has a time frame on it and is easily monitored.

  • Update CV
  • Interview coaching
  • Contact recruitment agencies
  • Contact competitors, related businesses etc
  • Assess short term financial position
  • Set up short term funding if required
  • Find bridging employment – casual/temporary work
  • Review recruitment options/offers
  • Budget for essential expenditure only

5. Empathy

Self-care.  During adversity or stressful times it is important that you look after yourself and have some self empathy.  It is easy to go onto auto pilot and look after everyone else.  However, if you are not looking after yourself you may burn out.  Remember resilience is about putting your own oxygen mask on before you can help anyone else.

  • Take at least 30 minutes each day to yourself
  • Try to stay as present as possible
  • Do 10 minutes of meditation and/or mindful breathing every day
  • Ask for any help or support you need
  • Be gentle with yourself

View details of our Resilience training here

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